Global Congress on Infectious Diseases & HIV/AIDS
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Accepted Abstracts

Aerobic Bacteriological Study of Post Operative Wound Infections with Special Referrence to MRSA and ESBL in a Tertiary Care Hospital

Ansh Chaudhary*
Bharati Vidyapeeth University, India

Citation: Chaudhary A (2020) Aerobic Bacteriological Study of Post Operative Wound Infections with Special Referrence to MRSA and ESBL in a Tertiary Care Hospital. SciTech Infectious Diseases 2020. Mauritius 

Received: December 27, 2019         Accepted: December 30, 2019         Published: December 30, 2019

Abstract

This study was undertaken to isolate aerobic bacterial pathogens from clinically suspected post operative wound infections and to determine their antibiogram. Samples that were sent to Microbiology laboratory from clinically suspected cases were processed further. The bacteria isolated on aerobic culture were identified to the species level by standard biochemical tests. Antibiotic sensitivity testing, phenotypic identification of MRSA and ESBL producers were done as per CLSI guidelines .Out of 50 samples, 44 samples shows culture positive. The infections are more common in emergency surgery than in elective surgery. Male:Female ratio-1:1.4. Infection was more common in age group of 20-30 years. The most common organism isolated - Staphylococcus aureus(43.18%) followed by E.coli(22.72%), Klebsiella(15.9%),CONS(13.63),Pseudomonas(4.54%).Out of 19 Staphylococcus aureus  9  were MRSA. In this study, 25 isolates of Gram positive cocci  were highly sensitive to Clindamycin and Linezolid. Out of 19 Gram negative isolates, 5 were found to be ESBL producers done by Double Disc Diffusion method. Among them  3 out of 10 (22,72%) E.coli and 2 out of 7(15.9%) Klebsiella were found to be ESBL producers. Marked resistance of isolates to commonly used antibiotics indicates the need for judicious use of these drugs to prevent the emergence of multi drug resistant strains. Proper infection control measures and a sound antibiotic policy are necessary to reduce post–operative wound infections.