Global Congress on Infectious Diseases & HIV/AIDS
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Accepted Abstracts

Compliance with Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test Results and Correlates among Clinicians in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria: 2018

Goodwill Bassey Effah*
University of Calabar, Nigeria

Citation: Effah GB (2020) Compliance with Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test Results and Correlates among Clinicians in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria: 2018. SciTech Infectious Diseases 2020. Mauritius 

Received: January 23, 2020         Accepted: January 27, 2020         Published: January 27, 2020

Abstract

Introduction: In sub-Saharan Africa, 80 to 85% of malaria-RDT negative febrile-outpatient, were given anti-malarial medicines. Previous studies recommended investigating determinants of ‘compliance with RDT’ results’ in specific cadre and setting, as intervention are most effective when context specific. Compliance with malaria RDT results and correlates among clinicians in Uyo was determined.
Methods: A cross-sectional study of clinicians selected using stratified sampling. Data was collected using self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire on socio-demographics, facility audit of RDT supplies, knowledge, perception and practice of clinicians. Outcome variable of interest was whether or not clinicians self-reported compliance with RDT results. Exposure variables of interest were whether or not clinicians received RDT training; received supportive supervision for malaria RDT; had positive perception of RDT usefulness; had good knowledge of RDT use (scores of ≥75% in questions testing for knowledge); had readily available treatment guidelines; had diagnostic capacity for other common febrile illness; experienced patient overload; experienced stock-out of supplies; work in the private/public sector. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted.
Results: Mean age of the clinicians was 33.0 years ± (6.0 SD). Of the total clinicians, 31.1% were female; 66.0% received RDT training; 36.4% had supportive supervision; 43.3% exhibited good knowledge of RDT use; 45.3% had positive perception of RDT usefulness and 41.7% relied on presumptive diagnosis. Compliance with RDT negative and positive results were 66.4% and 83.4% respectively. Compliance with RDT negative result was more in clinicians with good knowledge of RDT use (aOR =25.0; 95% CI = 2.92-213.52).  Compliance with RDT positive result was more in clinicians with good knowledge of RDT use (aOR=10.0; 95% CI =2.70-18.72), positive perception of RDT usefulness (aOR=10.2; 95%CI =3.50-29.63) and in health facilities in the public sector (aOR=5.0; 95% CI = 2.00- 11.11). Training on RDT use was not significantly associated with compliance with RDT negative (aOR=1.25; 95% CI=0.63-2.44) nor positive result (aOR=2.0; 95% CI=0.63-5.00).
Conclusions: Compliance was higher with RDT positive result; more in the public sector; and in clinicians with good knowledge of RDT use. However further research involving explicit (analytic) design is recommended.
Keywords: Compliance, Knowledge, Perception, Practice, Malaria, RDT results.