International Congress on Biotechnology and Food Sciences
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Accepted Abstracts

Effect of Cowpea Flour Inclusion on the Storage Characteristics of Composite Wheat-Cowpea Bread

Alimi JP*, Ahemen SA, Oklo AD, Alimi JO and Iluebbey PO
Nigerian Stored Products Research Institute, Nigeria

Citation: JP Alimi, SA Ahemen, AD Oklo, JO Alimi, PO Iluebbey (2020) Effect of Cowpea Flour Inclusion on the Storage Characteristics of Composite Wheat-Cowpea Bread. SciTech Food-BioTech Sciences 2020. 

Received: August 05, 2020         Accepted: August 14, 2020         Published: August 14, 2020

Abstract

Substitution of refined wheat flour (WF), the principal ingredient for bread making with cowpea flour (CF) could encourage diverse utilization of cowpea and reduce overdependence on wheat importation. However, the effect of cowpea flour inclusion on the storage characteristics of composite wheat-cowpea (CWC) bread which is essential for the commercial success of the product needs to be studied. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the effect of cowpea flour inclusion on the storage characteristics of CWC bread. CF was blended with wheat flour (WF) at 5, 10, 15 and 20% substitution levels. Flour samples were analyzed for proximate composition, rheological and functional properties. The CWC dough after proofing was cut into uniform sizes (300 g) and baked at 220°C for 30 min. The physical, chemical, microbiological and sensory qualities of the freshly baked bread samples were also determined. Changes in these qualities were also determined in the bread samples stored at ambient conditions (27 ± 2°C, 79 ± 3% RH) over a period of 5 days. Mould count ranged 1.00 to 3.00, 6.50 to 24.00 and 33.50 to 50.50 cfu/g for day 1, 3 and 5, respectively during storage. The order of overall acceptability of the CWC bread over the storage period was 5% >10% >15% >20%. The softness index ranged between 16.40-34.80, 12.00-31.75, 10.25-29.65, 7.90-26.40 and 7.25-23.20 mm for day 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. The CWC bread was acceptable to the sensory panelist for the first three days of its production. Bread made from the 100% WF was more shelf stable than the one made from the CWC flour.